Restorative justice – advice for practitioners

Restorative justice brings those harmed by crime or conflict and those responsible for the harm into communication, enabling everyone affected by a particular incident to play a part in repairing the harm and finding a positive way forward. This is part of a wider field called restorative practice.

Restorative practice can be used anywhere to prevent conflict, build relationships and repair harm by enabling people to communicate effectively and positively. Restorative practice is increasingly being used in schools, children’s services, workplaces, hospitals, communities and the criminal justice system.

Restorative practice can involve both a proactive approach to preventing harm and conflict and activities that repair harm where conflicts have already arisen.

Where the latter is required, a facilitated restorative meeting can be held. This enables individuals and groups to work together to improve their mutual understanding of an issue and jointly reach the best available solution. But in many cases a less formal approach, based on restorative principles, may be more appropriate.

Restorative practice supports people to recognise that all of their activities affect others and that people are responsible for their choices and actions and can be held accountable for them. It enables people to reflect on how they interact with each other and consider how best to prevent harm and conflict.

The Restorative Justice Council’s (RJC) Principles of Restorative Processes form the underpinning ethical framework for all forms of restorative practice.

Restorative justice in youth offending teams information pack
The Restorative Justice Council has published an information pack on restorative justice in youth offending teams (YOTs).

The information pack is intended to support YOTs in making greater use of restorative approaches.

The pack features articles showing the benefits of restorative justice as well as articles from those who are pushing at the boundaries of restorative justice work with young people. It includes accounts of restorative justice from the point of view of practitioners and case managers, demonstrating the benefits it can bring to their work with young people. But most importantly it also includes the voices of young people who have offended and victims who have taken part in a restorative justice process.

 

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